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Brand Development Campaign of the Year (Service)


Silver
Campaign Title

Jetstar goes Singlish, lah!
Client

Jetstar Asia
Agency

AKA Asia

Jetstar Asia is a joint Australian and Singaporean venture, but not many know that Singapore is a part of the airline’s heritage. The campaign aimed to position Jetstar as one of Singapore’s own, and build brand affinity and love among locals.

Living in a melting pot of cultures, traditions and languages, one thing that binds every Singaporean together is Singlish, the nation’s shared local language. So how did the airline make its brand feel like one of Singapore’s own? Speak their language—literally.

The idea embraced the brand’s Singaporean identity by adopting Singlish as Jetstar’s official language in an April Fools’ Day prank. The campaign tricked the nation into believing that in-flight and service announcements would be made in Singlish on Jetstar flights. This involved creating a behind-the-scenes mockumentary of the ‘Jetstar Singlistics training programme’ to keep fans (and the media) guessing. And it even included an announcement that Jetstar was translating its website into Singlish—driving people to the site to check whether the rumours were true.

The campaign could have stopped there. But when consumers begged the airline to make the Singlish flights a reality, the brand listened. Jetstar launched Singlish flights for one day only on Singapore’s 51st birthday, becoming an integral and much-talked-about part of the nation’s celebrations.

In one weekend, the April-fool video racked up 1.5 million views, primarily driven organically by media coverage. Preview footage of the first Singlish flight for National Day was shared over 20,000 times and viewed by over 2.2 million people. The National Day follow-up campaign landed over 120 pieces of media with a reach of over 25 million people. That means on average, every Singaporean saw a piece of media coverage about Jetstar five times in the run up to National Day. That’s no joke.

Silver
Campaign Title

How Korean Part-time Workers Got Full-time Respect
Client

Mediawill Networks
Agency

Weber Shandwick Korea

Alba Chunkuk launched an integrated campaign ‘Creating new culture for part-time workers’, in order to support and advocate the value of part-time employees to the Korean workforce by overhauling the standards of employment that its users had come to expect from potential employers. The major challenge was going to be dismantling the deeply ingrained culture of undervaluing and mistreating part-time workers. The strategy focused on driving a cultural shift within Korea surrounding part-time workers, reinforcing a new set of values, perceptions and behaviours. This was to be used as an opportunity for Alba Chunkuk to demonstrate a best-practice approach to supporting and recognising the value of part-time workers in Korea.

A wide range of activities was delivered from May to December 2016. Key activities included: developing a campaign microsite; constructing a 15-metre wide, six-metre-tall LED media wall titled ‘Voice of part-timers’ in the centre of Seoul; securing celebrity ambassadors and creating a series of videos where major Korean celebrities participated and gave words of encourage to part-timers; and delivering breakfast to part-time workers.

Through the strategic and multi-faceted campaign, the conversation about part-time workers in Korea successfully changed to one that was positive, showing the value they bring to Korea’s workforce. The campaign microsite received more than 5.4 million visitors during the campaign. On Facebook, YouTube and other targeted social media, the campaign commercials generated over 33 million views; the Make-A-Wish Mailbox videos saw over 48 million views. The campaign also contributed to Alba Chunkuk’s business results with a 221 percent increase in part-time worker registrations.

Bronze
Campaign Title

Dream BIG with Ola
Client

Ola
Agency

Adfactors PR

Ola, the market leader among taxi aggregators in India, realised early on that driver loyalty is a must for continued leadership. Accordingly, it wanted to consolidate the supply chain by adding more driver-partners to its platform, while retaining existing ones. Ola’s business model considers each driver-partner as an individual entrepreneur.

Adfactors set out to raise awareness about Ola among the driver community and encourage them to become Ola’s partners. First, it determined which publications were the most-read among the driver community, through a survey of driver-partners in 20 cities across India. The agency then identified drivers with unusual stories to tell, had Ola driver-partners tell their own stories, and collated these stories.

The agency created one-page documents on each of these driver stories, in the form of a narrative and in a way that would evoke media interest. The stories detailed their journey before and since they partnered with Ola. In each of these stories, Adfactors ensured that Ola was portrayed as a source of micro-entrepreneurial opportunities and how being an entrepreneur on the Ola platform was an attractive and rewarding proposition.

Media outreach efforts secured more than 500 inserts in 13 languages—yielding an ad-value of 650 million rupees (US$10 million) and 300 million opportunities-to-see. The 29 cities covered included Tier-1, Tier-2 and Tier-3 locations. Ola had 350,000 drivers at the end of 2015; by the end of 2016, it had over 550,000 driver-partners.