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Environmental Campaign of the Year


Silver
Campaign Title

Ford Design Challenge - Recycling Never Looked This Good
Client

Ford Motor Company
Agency

Ford WPP X Team led by Burson-Marsteller

As a responsible business, Ford Motor Company has been a pioneer in using recycled (post-consumer and/or post-industry waste) and renewable (plant-based) materials in the manufacture of its vehicles, among other initiatives. The company’s efforts in using recycled and renewable materials aim to reduce the amount of waste sent to landfills and lower the impact on non-renewable resources such as petroleum. Since 2000, the biomaterials development team at Ford has done extensive research to manufacture seat fabric from plastic bottles, seat foam from soy beans, insulating fabric from recycled denim and many more surprising innovations. Despite this innovation, awareness of Ford’s recycled and renewable materials strategy was low across Asia-Pacific.

Ford set out to improve its corporate reputation as a responsible automotive manufacturer. To address this need, the brand developed the ‘Ford design challenge—recycling never looked this good’, a comprehensive programme that covered nine Asia-Pacific markets including Mainland China, Thailand, Taiwan, Indonesia, Vietnam, Hong Kong, South Korea, Malaysia and the Philippines.

The strategy was to share a manufacturing innovation story through the lens of fashion. Ford communicated to consumers like a fashion brand—making the science behind this innovation an easy to understand concept. The brand challenged 10 designers to create high-fashion outfits using Ford car seat fabric, made entirely with post-consumer or industrial plastic waste. The design challenge and the outfits were leveraged to take a scientific concept of developing recycled materials to fashion and lifestyle media, influencers and audience beyond Ford’s traditional channels.

The Ford Design Challenge combined a creative event, with visual storytelling and strategic use of influencer platforms.

The campaign was immensely successful, exceeding perception and awareness targets, thereby improving public opinion of Ford as an environmentally responsible brand.

Bronze
Campaign Title

#UglyIsTheNewGood
Client

Electrolux
Agency

Ruder Finn Asia

UN studies have shown that 46 percent of fruits and vegetables never make it to consumers because of quality standards that overemphasise appearance. Edible but misshapen fruits and vegetables, or ‘ugly food’, are often discarded throughout the food chain. Because of this, so-called ‘ugly food’ is eliminated from sale stock right from the start. The result is that a substantial quantity of vegetables and fruits are discarded during the selection process.

To raise awareness of food waste within homes, and drive behavioural change through community-inspired, community-led initiatives, Electrolux conceived and launched the long-term social community initiative, ‘HappyplateSG’ in 2015. Its goal is to tackle food-related challenges and continue to find ways to give back to society through raising awareness and education on food waste issues.

As an extension of the ‘HappyplateSG’ initiative, Electrolux Singapore introduced an innovative ‘#Uglyisthenewgood’ initiative in 2016, focusing on ‘ugly food’, supported by results from a local survey.

The campaign resulted in widespread awareness among the various stakeholders. The concept resonated well with the local and foreign media, savvy online consumers and influencers, and non-profit organisations too.

Tier-1 media across various languages reported on the initiative, and 1 million viewers were exposed to a social experiment video. Fifteen social media influencers pledged their support and posted their ‘ugly food’ photos on Instagram and Facebook. Survey findings and a social media fundraising drive even generated news on international websites such as Global Voices and Hong Kong Free Press.

Even a non-profit initiative that offers unique dining experiences that gathers strangers and friends for conversations on issues pertinent to Singapore’s society, also embraced the importance of the ‘ugly food’ movement as a theme.