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Nonprofit Campaign of the Year


Gold
Campaign Title

"I Touch Myself" Project
Client

Cancer Council NSW
Agency

Hill+Knowlton Strategies Australia

One in eight Australian women will develop breast cancer. Like many countries around the world, Australia has many pink campaigns focused on fundraising. At the same time, the message and importance of detecting cancer in its early stages is not always given the priority it deserves. Almost a year prior to our campaign, rock legend Chrissy Amphlett of the infamous Australian band The Divinyls passed away following her battle with breast cancer at the age of 53. Chrissy was passionate about spreading awareness around the importance of early detection of breast cancer and died wanting her song I Touch Myself to become an anthem for women’s health around the world. Cancer Council NSW wanted a campaign that would change women’s behaviour, reminding them to check their breasts for signs of lumps and catch the disease early. As a result, the I Touch Myself Project was born – a powerful breast cancer awareness campaign asking Australian women to ‘touch themselves’, reminding them to get to know the look and feel of their breasts. The target audience for the #itouchmyself campaign was particularly broad – basically, it was aimed at all women, particularly those over the age of 25 who were unfamiliar with how to start monitoring changes with their breasts. It was a pro bono campaign, with no budget. Within hours of its release, the campaign became a media and social media circuit-breaker, building awareness and momentum ahead of the inaugural ‘I Touch Myself’ Day, April 21 2014, which was also the first anniversary of Chrissy’s passing. In the first 12 hours, the project received a mention every 15 minutes across Australian broadcast media. The video launched to an audience of 2.2 million on Australia’s top rating evening current affairs show Sunday Night.  

Bronze
Campaign Title

"Believe" Campaign
Client

Australian Paralympic Committee
Agency

Hill+Knowlton Strategies Australia

When more than half of the country thinks your organisation is fully funded by the government, how do you get them to open their wallets and start supporting your cause? That was the challenge that the Australian Paralympic Committee (APC) faced ahead of the 2016 Paralympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. While the team does receive some funding, it doesn’t stretch far enough and many of the athletes who qualify aren’t able to compete in the games. The end goal was simple. Secure the much-needed support from the Australian public, raise one-half of the target of A$200,000 in the lead-up to the games, and ultimately, enable the APC to put all our Aussie athletes on the plane to Rio. The APC conducted research that indicated there was a great public willingness to support Paralympic sport and that people identified closely with our Paralympic athletes, with many seeing them as more relatable than able-bodied athletes. This was a pro bono campaign. There was zero budget. Called the ‘Believe’ campaign, in a first for sport in this country, Australians were asked to ‘Pledge their Belief’ and support an individual athlete and their journey towards the next games. The agency launched to media in the lead-up to the Sochi 2014 Winter Paralympic Games, capitalising as Australia’s attention once again focused on the spectacle of a truly international sporting contest. The website pledgeyourbelief.org.au offered an inbuilt donation facility to support the campaign launch, and was fronted by six of our best-known Paralympic athletes. By commissioning a series of powerful, candid and at times confronting photographs of the various Paralympians who were to compete, the campaign relied on very distinctive and creative assets. The APC received more than $30,000 in public donations during the first 30 days of our campaign. In total, it raised over $100,000. 

Bronze
Campaign Title

Share My Knowledge for ChildFund New Zealand
Client

ChildFund New Zealand
Agency

Network Communication

Engaging New Zealanders to respond to issues of poverty overseas can be challenging, especially where the story does not involve immediate danger. A project that focuses on creating long-term income does not engage the hearts and minds of New Zealanders in the here and now. This was the case for ChildFund’s Livelihoods project in Sri Lanka, which offers micro-finance loans and mentoring to help families break free from poverty in a sustainable way. With limited and carefully managed funds for marketing, ChildFund needed a PR approach that would overcome a potential lack of enthusiasm for this story and truly connect with Kiwis to help raise awareness and funds for the project. Strategically, the organisation was also eager to develop stronger ties with businesses and influencers that could support the brand’s profile and projects in future. The strategy was to flip the Livelihoods project concept on its head by giving Kiwis the opportunity to be mentored by top local business leaders. Offering one-hour business lunches with leading CEOs via the popular auction website TradeMe, ChildFund built new networks of influence and drove a publicity campaign that captured the imagination of the public and media, and ensured key messages of the Livelihoods project were heard. The campaign had excellent media reach: 50 media items with reach of 3m+ (readership), 20 per cent were through high-profile outlets including a morning current affairs show, leading radio news channels, the National Business Review and New Zealand’s two largest print/online agencies NZME and Fairfax. Due to its success, the concept has been picked up by other ChildFund Alliance members and is soon to be deployed by ChildFund Australia, Bornefonden (Denmark), CCF Canada, EDUCO (Spain), and ChildFund International (US)