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Public Education Campaign of the Year


Gold
Campaign Title

Help A Child Reach 5
Client

Hindustan Unilever Limited
Agency

LinOpinion Golin

Every year, more than 2 million children don’t reach their fifth birthday due to diarrhoea and pneumonia. Many of these deaths are easily preventable through simple practices like washing hands with soap. Hand washing with soap can reduce diarrhoea by 45 per cent and pneumonia by 23 per cent and it’s estimated that this simple act could save the lives of over 600,000 children under 5 every year in India alone. The objective of this campaign was to convince consumers that hand washing with soap can actually save children’s lives, while at the same time build brand love and drive sales of Unilever’s Lifebuoy soap through this social mission. The integrated campaign aimed to amplify the hand washing message from the advertising team’s ‘Gondappa’ film by making this real and relevant to people. The agency set out to find authentic stories and characters, working with the team on the ground in a village in Madhya Pradesh. It identified a child ambassador to champion and bring the issue to life. There was some focus placed on a digital and social strategy, but this was only to help form a groundswell of support among higher income influentials. The main outreach strategy focused on traditional broadcast and print media as these are the most influential among the rural target audience and the most likely to bring about the behavioural change needed. Among other results, the campaign led to 1 in 3 mothers who never did so before now wash their hands. The hand washing rate among children tripled, while there was a 75 per cent reduction in child diarrhoea in Thesgora. Moreover, 6 more villages ‘adopted’, reducing the incidence of child diarrhoea from 42 per cent to 11 per cent.  

Gold
Campaign Title

Tackling Homophobia in Sport: Bingham Cup Sydney 2014
Client

Sydney Convicts Rugby Union Club
Agency

N/A

Many in Australia’s first gay rugby team, the Sydney Convicts, believed they had been pushed out of sport and some to the edge of suicide because of homophobia. Most of would not be playing rugby if it wasn’t for the Convicts; sport is one of the last places in modern society where homophobia is still common. Prior to the campaign, slurs were often ignored as ‘part of the game’ by officials and the public. Without question, gay people did not feel welcome and safe. Although this was just a group of athletes and volunteers, it wanted to help change this sporting culture. While most of the campaign activity occurred in 2014, it set the initial objectives in 2012 when it bid to host the 2014 Bingham Cup. The biennial tournament, considered the world cup of gay rugby, is named after a gay rugby player who helped crash a plane on Sept. 11 headed for Washington. Previous Bingham Cups had little or no media. The group managed to secure the Prime Minister’s support for the Bingham Bid in its efforts to change sporting culture. The campaign came across people who were openly homophobic and actively blocked the work. He group learned to be creative in how it approached potential supporters, using the right networks and gaining an understanding ahead of time around what would motivate their support. The most important was John Eales, arguably the world’s most respected rugby player and Australian Rugby Union board member. As a result, all Australian sports committed at a nationally televised press conference to ‘eliminate homophobia’ and implement an Anti-Homophobia and Inclusion Framework. Athletes from every sport became ‘ambassadors’ and spoke in media/at events about ending homophobia. It generated 3,000 plus media articles and features around the world. 

Silver
Campaign Title

MTV Rock the Vote - From A Campaign To A Revolution
Client

Viacom18 Media Pvt. Ltd.
Agency

N/A

MTV has always been at the forefront of every youth trend and apart from playing a huge role in pop culture, it has always led young people in the area of social activism. ‘Hero MTV Rock the Vote’ was a movement that aimed to make young people aware of the power they have, and to encourage them to act on their right to be heard. MTV partnered with Rock the Vote (USA), a non-profit, non-partisan organization, which pushes political awareness amongst youth across many countries including the US, Canada and Chile. Founded 21 years ago, Rock the Vote (USA) has registered more than 5 million young people to vote and has become a trusted source of information for young people about registering to vote and casting a ballot. Last year saw the launch of ‘MTV Act’ in India as a pro-social platform in order to highlight key youth causes — a non-partisan initiative which integrated on-air, on-ground, online media to connect with the youth in their language to urge them to step out and vote. In 2014, 120 million first time voters aged between 18-25 years were eligible to vote in India. MTV’s objective was to mobilise and motivate the youngsters to vote in General Elections 2014. It had to make voting cool and get the people to the voting booths. The campaign was launched in 4 phases across 20 cities across India. A new mobile feature ‘Dial the Hashtag’ was launched. The campaign kicked off its own music anthem, 12 plus college concerts and co-branded apparel with Puma.
It was supported by 30 of the biggest youth icons and celebrities in India and 10 national political leaders joined in to appeal to the youth to go out and vote. Channel viewership increased and it recorded 80 million impressions on digital media assets, activating 26 million fans on Facebook with an outreach of 15.6 million on Twitter, 30 million on television and 2 million live interactions on-ground. 

Bronze
Campaign Title

"I Touch Myself" Project
Client

Cancer Council NSW
Agency

Hill+Knowlton Strategies Australia

One in eight Australian women will develop breast cancer. Like many countries around the world, Australia has many pink campaigns focused on fundraising. At the same time, the message and importance of detecting cancer in its early stages is not always given the priority it deserves. Almost a year prior to our campaign, rock legend Chrissy Amphlett of the infamous Australian band The Divinyls passed away following her battle with breast cancer at the age of 53. Chrissy was passionate about spreading awareness around the importance of early detection of breast cancer and died wanting her song I Touch Myself to become an anthem for women’s health around the world. Cancer Council NSW wanted a campaign that would change women’s behaviour, reminding them to check their breasts for signs of lumps and catch the disease early. As a result, the I Touch Myself Project was born – a powerful breast cancer awareness campaign asking Australian women to ‘touch themselves’, reminding them to get to know the look and feel of their breasts. The target audience for the #itouchmyself campaign was particularly broad – basically, it was aimed at all women, particularly those over the age of 25 who were unfamiliar with how to start monitoring changes with their breasts. It was a pro bono campaign, with no budget. Within hours of its release, the campaign became a media and social media circuit-breaker, building awareness and momentum ahead of the inaugural ‘I Touch Myself’ Day, April 21 2014, which was also the first anniversary of Chrissy’s passing. In the first 12 hours, the project received a mention every 15 minutes across Australian broadcast media. The video launched to an audience of 2.2 million on Australia’s top rating evening current affairs show Sunday Night.